Artist’s Toolkit ~ Lorraine Khachatourians

I spent some thinking about what might be in my toolkit that I rely on the most. Brushes, paints, panels? Then it occurred to me that what I use the most, and is the basis for creating any work are my eyes. When I began to learn about painting and drawing, I realized I needed to look at the world differently, not just gazing around, but looking carefully, studying light and shape and colour and how it all came together in something that would be interesting to paint.

Now, it has become second nature to be looking for that special combination of light, shape and colour that I want to paint and share with others. And it can be anything, from the jars of marmalade I had just made, sitting on the counter when the January sun came through the window to light them up, to the beautiful giant lotus blossom I came across at Boffin’s gardens on a walk there. I just never know what I’ll see next.

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My Favourite Things ~ Paige Mortensen

My favourite things in my artist toolkit are my irons. Watercolour batik is all about the wax, and to be useful the wax needs to be melted. First I have a small encaustic iron that folds down to make a small skillet for melting the wax. I then use sponges, brushes or stamps to put the melted was onto my paper. This keeps the colour and allows me to build up layers of wax and watercolour until I finish the piece. Then, I need to get the wax off. To do this I put the piece between layers of newsprint and iron so that the wax comes off onto the newsprint. This is the most exciting part of my process!
I will have an iron at our Open Studio Show & Sale on Monday, November 26th at Grace Westminster Church 505 – 10th Street East. Come see it in action between 11 am and 9 pm!
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Art Toolkit Favourite ~ Molly Clark

What I listen to while I work is as important as any of my painting tools; it sets the tone for the work at hand. I remember how easily a set of landscape paintings came together while listening to Ian Tyson songs about the northern plains. Hearing author Stephen Jenkinson’s musings on heritage makes me think about a scene I’m painting and what it might have looked like generations ago. Creating art alongside an audiobook or podcast, learning while painting, killing two birds with one stone as they say, makes for productive days.

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My Favorite Thing ~ Patricia Katz

The Winsor Newton Watercolour Field Kit

I love to travel, and I love to sketch. So I always take my watercolour paints and a sketchbook with me when I am on the move.

Although I have several different travel palettes, one of my favorites is the Field Kit sold by Winsor Newton.

I love how compact it is; and for something so small, it sure packs in a lot of features. When unfolded, you end up with three mixing surfaces, and a water reservoir attached to one end of the kit. The finger loop on the back allows you to securely rest the entire paint box in the palm of your hand. 

The Field Kit also contains a small flask for carrying water, and a small paint brush nestled in the box. I personally find that paint brush too small for my purposes, and I often carry extra water in another bottle. However, for small sketches and quick adventures, the flask and brush will get you going.

The kit comes pre-loaded with pans of Winsor Newton pigments. However, I usually pop those out, and refill the pans with colour from my own tube paints. That way, I can be assured that I am carrying the colours I most like to use. Once set, the tube colours travel well, and are readily reactivated with a spritz of water.

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Open Paint Kit

 

Spotlight on ~ Margaret Bremner

 

A love of intricate detail, patterning, and the graphic quality of drawing have always been evident in my artwork. Several years ago I rediscovered pen-and-ink drawing, this time using structured patterns. I have an affinity for small objects, sparkle, and unusual effects. All this is present in my current mixed media work.

My imagery springs from what I see in the shapes and lines on my paper. Two years ago I was introduced to eco-dyeing and have found it most inspiring. I now eco-dye my own papers and then see what I can find in the marks on them. Frequent subjects are trees, leaves, houses, buildings, skies and celestial bodies.

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‘Feux d’artifice’

Single Iris copy

‘Single Iris’

Fairy Lane Nos. 1, 8, 13

‘Fairy Lane Nos. 1, 8, 13

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“This, Too, Shall Pass’

Spotlight on ~ Valerie Munch

Painting in watercolour has inspired me to stop and enjoy all things bathed in light and casting interesting shadows. Red poppies in my garden, I have never had as many, and moments from a special trip to Nova Scotia, are among the subjects of my work  for our group show at Grace Westminster Church auditorium, April 13 to 15.  Look foreword to seeing you in the spring!

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Spotlight on ~ Lorraine Khachatourians

What inspires me to paint is usually something nearby, whose shape or colour interests me. Highlighting those bottles or shells or flowers with focussed light brings out the elements of those items that intrigue me. As a result, I collect things – old bottles, old silver, shells, glass floats, leaves, seeds, everyday things – and find interesting fruits and vegetables, and raid my garden for inspiration. Then I assemble them to play with colours, shapes, reflections and textures. Some end up in my paintings, which I hope you will come by and see, along with all of our group’s new works, at our upcoming April show, April 13 – 15 at Grace Westminster Auditorium (details coming soon; watch our Facebook page too).

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‘Peaches and Copper Pot’, Oil on linen panel

You can see more of my work at Redberry Art.